2015 ABIA Winners

2015 ABIA Book Award Winners

 

General Fiction Book of the Year

Lost & Found (Hachette)

Brooke Davis

 

Biography of the Year

A Bone of Fact (Pan Macmillan)

David Walsh

 

Illustrated Book of the Year

Anzac Treasures (Murdoch Books)

Peter Pedersen

 

Literary Fiction Book of the Year

Foreign Soil (Hachette)

Maxine Beneba Clarke

 

General Non Fiction Book of the Year

Where Song Began (Penguin)

Tim Low

 

International Book of the Year

All The Light We Cannot See (HarperCollins)

Anthony Doerr

 

Older Children

Withering – by – Sea (HarperCollins)

Judith Rossell

 

Younger Children

The 52 – STOREY TREEHOUSE (Pan Macmillan)

Andy Griffiths

 

Small Publishers’ Kids Book of the Year

Tea and Sugar Christmas (National Library of Australia)

Jane Jolly and Robert Ingpen

 

Small Publishers’ Adult Book of the Year

Diary of a Foreign Minister (NewSouth Books)

Bob Carr

 

Matt Richell Award for New Writer

Lost & Found (Hachette)

Brooke Davis

 

BOOK OF THE YEAR

The 52 – STOREY TREEHOUSE (Pan Macmillan)

Andy Griffiths

Illustrated by Terry Denton

 

2015 ABIA Industry Award Winners

INDEPENDENT BOOK RETAILER OF THE YEAR

Avenue Bookstore, Melbourne

 

INNOVATION AWARD

Hardie Grant

 

NATIONAL BOOK RETAILER OF THE YEAR

Dymocks

 

ONLINE BOOK RETAILER OF THE YEAR

Booktopia 

 

PUBLISHER OF THE YEAR

Pan Macmillan

 

SMALL PUBLISHER OF THE YEAR

Black Inc.

 

Sonia Hartnett Q&A

Q&A with Sonya Hartnett, author of Golden Boys, shortlisted for the 2015 ABIA Literary Fiction Book of the Year

Sonya Hartnett with Golden Boys

How did the idea to write your book originate?

I wanted to write about certain feelings and memories from my own childhood – the freedom our bikes gave us, the silence of the streets, the worry about our warring parents, the boredom of church, the shut doors and empty gardens of the neighbourhood. I don’t think one ever really forgets these feelings, but I wanted them in print, just in case.

What’s your favourite thing about being a published author?

It’s hard to choose one thing. There are lots of good things, and a lot of bad things. Publishing has been my life. Without it, I probably wouldn’t have stayed in as many nice hotels.

What are some of the things you love about Australian bookstores?

If you’re lucky, you can jump on your bike and ride to one, and they are stocked to the gills with yum things from all around the world. Also, they smell nice.

What’s the most recent Australian book you loved?

I read Gideon Haigh’s new nonfiction Certain Admissions in proof a few weeks ago. It’s about a murder in Melbourne in 1949. It was interesting reading about this event with which I was completely unfamiliar, yet which galvanised a city I know well. It made me think about the recent past, that time that is gone, but only just.

If you could meet any Australian author, dead or alive, who would you like to meet?

Jack Marx, at a pub, with a publisher’s credit card on the bar.

What Australian book had the biggest impact on you as a child?

I read Ivan Southall’s Josh in my early teens. It was the first novel that showed me a landscape I recognised, and taught me that this landscape could be used as the setting for a book. The impact of that novel on my career is inestimable.

After readers have finished your book, which Australian book would you recommend they read next?

Animal People, by Charlotte Woods.

Sulari Gentill Q&A

Q&A with Sulari Gentill, author of A Murder Unmentioned, shortlisted for the 2015 ABIA Small Publishers’ Adult Book of the Year

Gentill_Sulari

How did the idea to write your book originate?

The idea for this book evolved more than originated. A Murder Unmentioned is the sixth book in the Rowland Sinclair series. Each book now, seems to be a natural evolution of what has gone before, a new facet of the 1930s with its own place in the events and milieu of that tumultuous time between the wars. With every instalment of this series, I find more material, more questions to explore and consider in future books. The seeds of A Murder Unmentioned were sown in the initial pages of the first book—I just didn’t know it at the time. Each book after that seemed to give me a little more until eventually this novel evolved.

What’s your favourite thing about being a published author?

There are many reasons why writers wish to be published. For me, it’s primarily the notion that being read gives the characters in my stories an existence that is independent of me. I could die tomorrow and Rowland Sinclair would continue to live in the minds and imaginations of readers who have never known me. It’s a little like I’m connected to all my readers by a friend in common. Though writers are very human, publication give stories a kind of immortality.

What are some of the things you love about Australian bookstores?

Invariably Australian bookstores are owned and run by people who above all have a love of books and the written word. They are a depository of imagination, expression and ideas in world that still sorely needs all of those things. I love the physical act of browsing, of pulling books off the shelf, reading the endorsement cards from staff, opening the book to read the first page and holding it up against others that have caught my eye.

What’s the most recent Australian book that you read and loved?

Remember Smith’s Weekly by George Blaikie. I found and acquired the book as research for the novel I’m currently writing. It’s a wonderful, personal account of one of Australia’s most controversial and sensationalist old newspapers, and the extraordinary journalists and artists who worked on it.

If you could meet any Australian author, dead or alive, who would you like to meet?

Norman Lindsay. I find him fascinating as a writer, an artist and a human being. I’d like to think we could have a very lively conversation, though in reality I might be too star struck (or frightened given that he’s dead) to say anything but “Yes, Mr. Lindsay”.

What Australian book had the biggest impact on you as a child?

The Adventures of Blinky Bill – I read it when I was about 6 or 7 years old … when I was still a new immigrant. I remember trying to eat gumnuts.

After readers have finished reading your book, which Australian book would you recommend they read next?

Assuming they liked my book? of course they did! Robert Gott’s Will Power Series. Set just a little bit after the Rowland Sinclair series, they’re clever, wickedly funny and very Australian.